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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> we need a response from the white house, we can't negotiate with ourselves. >> john boehner made a point at expressing dismay the president hasn't responded two days after the republicans sent him a fiscal cliff counteroffer. >> if the president doesn't agree with our proposal and our outline, i think he's got an obligation to send one to the congress. and a plan that can pass both chambers of congress. >> by trying to keep gop frustration on the president, boehner appears to be keeping conservative lawmakers off his own back for now. >> what's mood inside the conference. >> very united, very supportive with the speaker. >> multiple sources tell cnn in a private meeting with house republicans, boehner got no flow back for producing $800 billion in tax revenue, despite backlash from conservative groups outside congress. >> any complaints about this new revenue? >> i didn't hear anything. >> the speaker has full support of the conference to move forward and get something done for the american people. >> so far, rank and time republicans are allowing boehner to play out this showdow
john boehner, has there been any follow-up that we know of? are they talking on the phone? are they gearing up for an actual meeting? john boehner staying in town while this crisis continues. >> reporter: that's right, wolf. he is. and we are told that no additional calls, no further discussions that we are aware of. there was that call, and that came after a lot of criticism on the white house that the president was not negotiating face-to-face with john boehner. but what we're seeing here is this strategy that the president has employed before where instead of sitting down with republicans, he takes his message outside of sort of inside the beltway or brings people to the white house. you've seen him sitting down with middle class americans also bringing ceos and small business owners here to the white house. that's what he is using to put pressure on congress to get a deal. >> yeah. let's see if he invites the speaker to come over to the white house and put some pressure on him. >> reporter: that's right. >> see if they can -- what they can do. as we all know, that cloc
's house speaker john boehner describing his latest negotiations with the president, just over the phone last night. >> the president and i had a pretty frank conversation about just how far apart we are. >> dana bash is our senior congressional correspondent. she s unearthed some surprising new details here about the speaker's latest offer to the president. dana, what can you tell us? >> reporter: well, we were told first earlier today by democratic source that part of the reason why that phone call between the president and the speaker didn't go so well to put it mildly is because part of the republican counteroffer they sent to the white house yesterday included a renewed call for, quote, permanent tax cuts for the wealthiest americans. now, we know that that is a nonstarter in general for the president. he said it ump team times, but the democrats at the white house felt that to put the word permanent in a republican offer made clear according to the source i talked to that it was -- that they just don't understand what needs to be done to get something to pass the senate and the hou
he's got an obligation to send one to the congress. >> so that was speaker boehner obviously flanked by republicans. we'll get you that sound bite from the president because i want to make sure you hear both sides. here is the question i'm hearing people ask. if we go off the cliff here, how big of a hit will we take on taxs? stand by because i'm good to give you the closest answer i possibly can. to help me with that is laurie montgomery, the fiscal policy reporter for the washington post. so, laurie, welcome to you here. and your paper this morning, you ran through a couple of tax scenarios which were pretty palletable so we want to show our view whaeers what you ran through. let me run through two. we'll look at this first one. so everybody take a look at this graphic. this is scenario number one, married couple, two kids, one in college, combined income of $137,000. you see the numbers here first under the democrats' plan, passed by the senate, not by the house, they would see their taxes rise 2500 bucks a year. just below that, the republican plan, passed by the house in august,
to get a deal with the house speaker john boehner over taxes and spending cuts. our chief political analyst gloria borger is here to take a closer look at the agreements, the disagreements, i guess there's more disagreements than agreements. let's step back and see where these two sides stand, gloria. >> let's step back from the cliff here for a minute, wolf. and you'll see that on tax, which is of course the crux of this matter, there's a huge difference between congressional republicans who want to raise $800 billion over ten years from tax increases. and of course the white house that wants to, you know, basically double that. i mean, the white house says, we need to get more revenue from taxes. if you break apart these tax number, take a look, because of course we know, the big issue, the theological issue here, wolf, is raising rates. the white house says let's raise them back to bill clinton's days. and the republicans of course say, no way, let's not raise those rates. here's what's really interesting to me, though. both sides say in the future they want to do the same thing.
john boehner. he is offering $800 billion in increased revenue. he also wants much deeper cuts in entitlements and $800 billion in other cuts many spending. we've got reporters -- i want to start off with you. dana bash on the hill. a standoff here, republicans essentially saying, look, the president is not being reasonable here, and then you have the white house saying this is magic beans and fairy dust. is this a lot of posturing here? are we really at an impasse? >> yes to both of those questions. there is a lot of post urg, but we do seem to be at an impasse. i want to show our viewers some video that will illustrate just what we're talking about. that is pictures of members of the house of representatives leaving for the week, and now, i don't want tower viewers to get concerned. the calendars on the desk tops are not wrong. it is still wednesday. this did happen at noon on wednesday. it would be nice if all of us could do that, but -- >> yeah, really. >> this is not an accident. republican leaders say that they just simply have nothing to vote on right now on the floor of
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)